All posts by lg75

Novel imaging of the degeneration underlying illnesses such as multiple sclerosis to allow for faster development of treatment strategies

Normal brain function depends on wrappings of nerve cells by myelin which enhances the speed of conduction of electrical information in the brain and spinal cord.  Disruptions of myelin are the source of the devastating movement problems with vision and movement in multiple sclerosis. This breakthrough allows the visualization of myelin, even on single nerve … Continue reading Novel imaging of the degeneration underlying illnesses such as multiple sclerosis to allow for faster development of treatment strategies

2016 Symposium to feature the winners of the Brain Prize

Symposium Schedule The Inaugural Cornell Neurotech Mong Family Foundation Symposium will feature three Cornell Alums who won the Brain Prize, Winfried Denk, Ph.D. ’89, Karel Svoboda ’88, and David Tank, M.S. ’80, Ph.D. ’83. September 29, 2016 G10 Biotechnology Building Time: 10 am- 5pm Speakers For more information email: neurotech@cornell.edu

Melissa Warden and Jesse Goldberg awarded New Innovator Awards

Neurotech Advisory Board members Melissa Warden and Jesse Goldberg were each awarded New Innovator Awards from the National Institute of Health. The new innovator award is one of the hardest to receive from the NIH and is designed to “support exceptionally creative, early-career investigators who propose innovative, high-impact projects.” http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2015/10/three-researchers-receive-nih-new-innovator-awards

A new tool probes the inner workings of the brain

The application of three-photon microscopy allows for the visualization of the normal structure and function of single neurons deep in the living brain of mice, one of the most important model animals in neuroscience.  Watching structure and function over time is needed to reveal how the brain works and what changes during disease. http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/01/three-photon-microscopy-improves-biological-imaging myelin … Continue reading A new tool probes the inner workings of the brain

Watching re-growing neurons inside the spinal cord to directly test treatments for spinal injury

Chronic imaging paperLooking deeply into living spinal cord of an animal over months will allow one to literally watch the efficacy of treatments for spinal cord injury.  It also opens the possibility of watching the  activity of neuronal circuits that generated movement in normal animals and after treatment. http://www.nature.com/nmeth/journal/v9/n3/abs/nmeth.1856.html Chronic imaging paper pdf